Edward M. Tauber

Edward M. Tauber founded Brand Extension Research in 1981. He is president of the company. Dr. Tauber earned his Ph.D. in marketing from Cornell University. He was formerly a full professor at the University of Southern California and editor of the Journal of Advertising Research. Dr. Tauber was Executive Vice President and Research Director for DFS/Saatchi and Nestle/Carnation.

He developed the concept of “brand extension” which was published in articles entitled, “Brand Franchise Extension” from Business Horizons in 1981 and “Brand Leverage: Strategy For Growth in a Cost Control World,” from the Journal of Advertising Research in 1988. From the research methods he developed, his company created many brand extension products for Fortune 500 companies that generate over a billion dollars in sales annually.

Dr. Tauber wrote the seminal article “Why Do People Shop” in the Journal of Marketing and the book “Market Structure Analysis” with James H. Myers.

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Structuring Markets

Chapter 1 – Structuring Markets

Chapter 1 of Market Structure Analysis

The chapter details the emergence of a new technology: the application of multivariate analytic techniques to measurements of consumer perception, motivation, and behavior. The purpose is to provide useful ways of structuring markets for more effective marketing planning. Also a primary issue is the promotion of a greater understanding and usage of all techniques by scholars and business firms.

Behavioral Market Structure Model

Chapter 10 – Epilogue: Behavioral Market Structure Model

Chapter 10 of Market Structure Analysis

The authors review the various technologies presented in the book as they relate to the more current conceptual model, called the behavioral market structure model. The chapter considers the contributions of each technology to the behavioral model. Also discussed is a realistic perspective for the use of market structure analysis in the market planning process.

Introduction to Scaling Methods for Product Positioning

Chapter 2 – Introduction to Scaling Methods for Product Positioning

Chapter 2 of Market Structure Analysis

The authors provide a discussion of multidimensional scaling, including an analysis of measurement theory and the four major types of measuring scales. The major types of scales reviewed are nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio. The goal is to develop an understanding of how various positioning techniques differ with regard to data input and output.

Positioning Using Multidimensional Scaling Techniques (MDS)

Chapter 3 – Positioning Using Multidimensional Scaling Techniques (MDS)

Chapter 3 of Market Structure Analysis

The chapter provides a comprehensive analysis of nonmetric multidimensional scaling, including its origin, evolution, and application. The goal is to create an illustration of the scaling process, with topics including form of original input data, statistical processing, and final output. The study provided argues that perception, rather than preference or objective analysis, can best explain selection among major brands.

Positioning Using Factor Analysis

Chapter 4 – Positioning Using Factor Analysis

Chapter 4 of Market Structure Analysis

The chapter explores alternative technologies for constructing positioning maps. The main focus is factor analysis, which is used to extract basic dimensions which become axes on a positioning map. The resulting map purports to be as interpretable as those produced by nonmetric scaling.

Positioning Using Discriminant Analysis

Chapter 5 – Positioning Using Discriminant Analysis

Chapter 5 of Market Structure Analysis

The chapter proposes the use of discriminant analysis to product/service attribute ratings in an effort to establish the perceptual space for products of a given type. The approach uses input data exactly the same as factor analysis, and applies the technique to the same data in chapter four. The goal is to establish the need for market planners to differentiate between perceptual and preference positioning maps and to know what each is based on.

Market Segmentation Using Multivariate Analysis

Chapter 6 – Market Segmentation Using Multivariate Analysis

Chapter 6 of Market Structure Analysis

The authors deal with the problem of how to identify groupings of consumers in such a way that they will respond differently to different market mixes. The chapter focuses on the response-based approach to locating useful market segments. The chapter is also concerned with identification of potential market segments based on patterns of information contained in survey questionnaires.

Market Structure Studies SteffIre Process

Chapter 7 – Market Structure Studies SteffIre Process

Chapter 7 of Market Structure Analysis

The chapter analyzes the approach to product planning as proposed by Stefflre, a cultural anthropologist. Stefflre’s process of perception and positioning differs vastly from statisticians and psychometricians. The authors support his notion that few items have clear intrinsic properties and thus will be used differently by different cultures.

Benefit Structure Analysis

Chapter 8 – Benefit Structure Analysis

Chapter 8 of Market Structure Analysis

The chapter describes the technique of benefit structure analysis, developed by one of the authors and used to systematically search for needs in broadly defined markets. The resulting benefit structure study has two objectives: to identify the most important consumer needs within a broad need area, and; to measure the extent to which these needs are not being met. Awareness of both the size of the needs and need deficiencies offers ideal direction for product improvement and promotion.

Conjoint Measurement Multiple Trade Off Analysis

Chapter 9 – Conjoint Measurement: Multiple Trade-Off Analysis

Chapter 9 of Market Structure Analysis

The chapter discusses two approaches to deriving consumers’ utility functions for attributes and levels of attributes. These approaches, orthogonal array and pair-wise trade-off comparisons, are currently the most widely used. The ultimate goal is to deal with the problem of predicting psychological response to physical change in stimuli.

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